Partners

Lived Experience:
impacting our work and the field

Core Partners

Our seven core partners are networks dedicated to bringing philanthropic attention and dollars to underserved communities. Societal inclusiveness and equity of philanthropic dollars are woven into all our partners’ missions, visions, and programmatic areas. By uniting our networks, skills, and resources, we comprise a focused contingent of social-justice seekers.

AAPIP
Founded in 1990, AAPIP is a national membership and philanthropic advocacy organization dedicated to advancing philanthropy in Asian American/Pacific Islander communities. Our members include foundations, staff, and trustees of grantmaking institutions as well as funders and nonprofit organizations in ten regional chapters in the United States. We engage communities and philanthropy to address unmet needs, serve as a resource for and about AAPI communities, support and facilitate giving by and to our communities, and incubate new ideas.

ABFE

ABFE is a membership organization that advocates for responsive and transformative investments in Black communities.  Partnering with foundations, nonprofits and individuals, ABFE provides its members with professional development, technical assistance and networking opportunities to increase the impact of their work. Established in 1971 as the Association of Black Foundation Executives, the organization was credited with many of philanthropy’s early gains in diversity. It since has evolved into an influential network. In 2013, the organization shed its descriptor and adopted the simpler ABFE (ab-fee) to better reflect its broadening membership.

EmergingPractitioners
EPIP is a national network of foundation professionals and other change makers who strive for excellence in the practice of philanthropy. We are an inclusive group of highly skilled and effective change makers committed to working together to build a just, equitable, and sustainable society. Our communities face numerous fundamental challenges that require transformative philanthropy, innovative thinking, and collaboration among senior and emerging leaders. EPIP helps mold and develop new leaders who are equipped to tackle society’s most entrenched problems.

LGBTQ

Working side by side with funders and our movement’s organizations through three decades, Funders for LGBTQ Issues remains the sole organization dedicated exclusively to increasing institutional giving to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) communities. We mobilize philanthropic resources that enhance the well-being of LGBTQ communities; promote equity; and advance racial, economic, and gender justice.

HIP
Hispanics in Philanthropy’s mission is to strengthen Latino leadership, voice, and equity. Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP) is a transnational network of more than 500 grantmakers, donors, and philanthropic leaders committed to Latino communities in the United States and Latin America. HIP engages Latinos in philanthropy, identifies emerging needs and promising new organizations and leaders in Latino communities, and leads wide-impact, multi-site philanthropic programs to strengthen Latino communities, leaders, and organizations. Through its award-winning Funders’ Collaborative, HIP has built the capacity of more than 500 grassroots Latino nonprofits and leaders through grants and trainings in sixteen sites across the U.S. and Puerto Rico. In Latin America, HIP funds community-based economic development projects that draw upon the resources of the Latino diaspora. Hispanics in Philanthropy currently has a staff of eighteen, with its national headquarters based in Oakland, CA with regional offices in Miami, Mexico City, and North Carolina.

NativeAmericans
NAP is a national membership organization that serves as a bridge between Native and philanthropic communities. Through our programs, we work with tribal communities and Native nonprofits to improve development and relations with their funders. In addition, we work with mainstream and tribal philanthropy to be more strategic about the grantmaking and investment in Indian Country.

Women
The Women’s Funding Network is a growing community of more than 100 women’s funds and foundations spanning 20 countries. We accelerate women’s leadership and invest in solving critical social issues– from women’s economic security to global security — by bringing together the financial power, influence and voices of women’s funds.

Collaborating Partners

In addition to our seven Core Partners, CHANGE Philanthropy is also welcoming Collaborating Partners into our coalition.

Each Collaborating Partner:

  • Has mission-centered or aligned with social justice/equity
  • Has a diverse network that honors lived experience
  • Serves national scope with primarily U.S. focused
  • Represents a membership association or have an active network

National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy (NCRP), Neighborhood Funders Groups (NFG), and the Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE) join CHANGE Philanthropy as Collaborating Partners.

ncrp-logo-for-web-2

National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy (NCRP) promotes philanthropy that serves the public good, is responsive to people and communities with the least wealth and opportunity, and is held accountable to the highest standards of integrity and openness.

nfg_logo

Founded in 1980, the mission of Neighborhood Funders Group (NFG) is to build the capacity of philanthropy to advance social justice and community well-being. With a network of 90 institutions and over 900 participants, NFG organizes alignment and collaboration within the field of social justice philanthropy, develops leaders within its national base of members, and encourages the support of policies and practices that advance economic, racial, and social justice. NFG is one of the few vehicles for grantmakers to engage across issues, geographies, communities, and strategies. We provide ongoing support for member-driven programming and highly regarded national convenings that bring together NFG funder members with other strategic partners to advance community change work and philanthropic support for it.

logo_words_bluecenter

The goal of the Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE) is to increase the amount and effectiveness of resources aimed at combating institutional and structural racism in communities through capacity building, education, and convening of grantmakers and grantseekers. Since its inception in January 2003, PRE has directly engaged hundreds of foundation representatives (including program staff, management, board members and individual donors) and philanthropic infrastructure organizations in strengthening their skills and understanding of how they can advance the mission of achieving racial justice through their own philanthropic institutions. PRE) is to increase the amount and effectiveness of resources aimed at combating institutional and structural racism in communities through capacity building, education, and convening of grantmakers and grantseekers. Since its inception in January 2003, PRE has directly engaged hundreds of foundation representatives (including program staff, management, board members and individual donors) and philanthropic infrastructure organizations in strengthening their skills and understanding of how they can advance the mission of achieving racial justice through their own philanthropic institutions.

 

 

Investing Partners

Our investing partners have demonstrated their deep commitment to advancing equity by underwriting our work. Our investing partners include:

fordfoundation

 

Hewlett_Logo_RGB_full

 

Kapor

Past Investing Partners

W.K. Kellogg Foundation
Marguerite Casey Foundation
D5 Coalition
The California Endowment
Kresge Foundation (ABFE)
Casey Family Programs
Surdna Foundation
Arcus Foundation
Blue Shield of CA Foundation
California Wellness Foundation
Annie E Casey Foundation
Levi Strauss Foundation
MacArthur Foundation (AAPIP)
Children & Youth Investment Trust
Evelyn and Walter Haas, Jr. Fund

Lived Experience:
impacting our work and the field

Lived Experience

impacting our work and the field

Marvin

Marvin Webb
Director of Operations & Member Services
Funders for LGBTQ Issues

How do you identify yourself?

African American 50+ year old gay male.

Tell us about a past experience that inspires the work you do today.

I come from the Midwest, from divorced parents, raised in the United Methodist Church, attending private schools when my mother worked for the public school district as a teacher. I was a modern dancer and lived in NYC during the peak of the AIDS epidemic.

What change do you hope to see in philanthropy?

More inclusiveness in all that people do – not just making sure there are enough gays, women, Blacks, Hispanics, and Native Americans in the Philanthropy work pool. For me, this is about a change in lifestyle acknowledging the brilliance and range of depth that diversity can give an institution, corporation, and outputs/outcomes.